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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  January 18, 2017 9:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello. it's wednesday. it's 9am. i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. borisjohnson says countries are "queuing up" to sign free trade deals with britain when it leaves the eu. the foreign secretary's optimistic assessment comes as eu leaders prepare to give their verdicts on theresa may's brexit speech. we'll have the details. we have an exclusive report from a rescue ship in the mediterranean where thousands of migrants risk their lives to reach europ. we're going to come to you. stay where you are. we're going to come to you. will tougher sentences for people caught fighting with dogs help tackle it? one undercover investigator tells us how the widespread the practice is and what's being done to stop it. hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until 11am. are you getting a poor deal from your mobile phone provider?
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it comes as ee is fined for overcharging tens of thousands of customers who called its customer service number. we'll have more details on that shortly. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning. use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. the foreign secretary has said countries are "queuing up" to sign free trade deals with britain when it leaves the european union. borisjohnson also suggests that agreements could be achieved quickly after the article 50 negotiations are concluded, and said the uk would not be "hauling up the drawbridge", despite the new migration controls promised by theresa may. our political correspondent tom bateman has more. theresa may's brexit speech brought the most clarity yet on her approach to the negotiations. she told ministers and european diplomats she wanted ambitious trade deals with the rest of the eu, but she confirmed britain would leave the union's formalfree— rade area.
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i want to be clear. what i am proposing cannot mean membership of the single market. the uk would have control of immigration policy, she said. and, in an unexpected move, the prime minister revealed she would be prepared to walk away from the talks if the deal wasn't good enough. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, writes this morning that countries are queuing up to do trade deals with britain. today, attention turns to the response from the rest of the eu. the head of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, is due to speak. some in the european parliament believe mrs may's demands are unrealistic. it creates an illusion. an illusion that you can go out of the single market, that you can go out off the customs union, and that you can cherry—pick, and you can have still a number of advantages. the prime minister will face mps later with some opponents saying her plan risks an economic catastrophe. she has called for unity over brexit. so far, at least, that
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seems some way off. let's get more from our political guru norman smith. what if she doesn't get a deal? well, ministers arejust what if she doesn't get a deal? well, ministers are just refuse to go counsel ten na ns well, ministers are just refuse to go counsel ten nans that possibility. i have been struck at the confidence frankly oozing from them despite the fact that mrs may yesterday massively ratcheted up the sta kes yesterday massively ratcheted up the stakes saying we want a deal in two yea rs stakes saying we want a deal in two years and we want a special deal that gives us everything that we wa nt that gives us everything that we want in terms of trade and in terms of the single market and the customs union and by the way, if you don't give us what we want, we're going to walk away. they say, they have been encouraged by the reaction from other eu leaders and it will be interesting to see when we hear from the president of the european commission later who is talking to the european parliament, you know, whether they're justified in thinking that mrs may's message has
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gone down 0k thinking that mrs may's message has gone down ok with the rest of europe. they have been buoyed by the reaction at home. the telegraph, "may's bold terms for brexit." the daily mail, it is like a comic book strip of mrs may as a sort of latter day mrs t! certainly listening to david davis, the brexit secretary this morning, he was saying what could go wrong? he said what could go wrong? a deal which is in the interests of both britain and the european union that seeks to preserve the best of what we have whilst giving us the freedom to trade globally and a deal which, a proposal, for a deal which will get hopefully the whole country behind it. those who voted leave and those who voted remain because it is in the interests of the whole country. that's the aim. we're not seeking a fight. we're seeking to get a good deal which serves everybody. that's
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the most important thing to have in the most important thing to have in the front of your mind. of course, quite a lot could go wrong, not least if mrs may doesn't get the deal she wants then we pretty much just fall out of the eu and have to revert what are known as world trade organisation rules which means tariffs, which means more expensive goods which is a significant blow for british business. so the stakes are absolutely colossal and no wonder that ministers are hoping it will turn out ok because if it doesn't, the potential ramifications for this country are colossal. mobile operator ee has been fined £2.7 million for overcharging tens of thousands of customers. more than 30,000 customers have been affected, overcharged by a quarter of a million pounds. the regulator has explained why they've taken action. well, we think this is a significant fine and fines is a significant
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fine and fines are a good deterrent for companies. they don't like to be on the receiving end of fines well, we think this is a significant fine and fines are a good like this, but i think what really matters to consumers is that, companies get the services they provide and our bills right first time and that's why we hope that this fine today sends a clear message, notjust to ee, but right across the industry that we won't hesitate to help in and levy fines if they get that wrong for customers. rachel horne rachel home is here. ee were going to give the money to charity, but until ofcom stepped in and said hang ona minute, until ofcom stepped in and said hang on a minute, ee were saying it was too difficult to trace them. ofcom forced them to trace the customers. they have reimbursed up to £200,000. there is £60,000. ee have given the money to charity, but ofcom said you must still try and find the customers. ofcom are starting to
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flex their muscles. you might remember back in october we had a big fine for talktalk. it was £400,000, but that was to do with cyber security, rather than customer relations. vodafone were hit with a fine of over £4 million, part of that was handling customer complaints. ofcom are taking a sta nce complaints. ofcom are taking a stance and saying, look, you need to treat your customers properly, if you don't, we will wade in and we will take action. i spoke to ofcom earlier and they said it is time the customers or the companies start treating customers properly and if they don't there will be consequences. joanna is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. president obama has cut the sentence of chelsea manning, who was jailed for 35 years for leaking intelligence secrets. the former military analyst, who was born bradley manning but had hormone therapy in prison, will be released in may. our correspondent in washington rajini vaidyanathan has more. chelsea manning was responsible for one of the largest leaks of government secrets in american history.
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born bradley manning, it was while serving in iraq that the low—ranking private hacked government databases, handing more than 700,000 classified documents to julian assange's wikilea ks organisation. manning's supporters have campaigned for years for her release. they maintain she's a whistleblower, not a traitor. the reduction of chelsea manning's sentence means she's only served three years out of a 35—year term she was handed in 2013. during the trial, manning's lawyers said their client struggled with gender identity disorder. soon after, it was announced that bradley would be known as chelsea and live as a woman. she's being held at a male prison, and tried to take her life on two occasions. i'd say 12 to 16 months, her mental state and her condition have deteriorated significantly.
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she became depressed and there was clearly a real risk to her wellbeing, if not her life, if she had remained in this prison. julian assange thanked those who campaigned for chelsea's release, and edward snowden, who also leaked government secrets, tweeted his thanks to president obama. but the republican speaker of the house, paul ryan, said president obama's decision to cut short chelsea manning's sentence was outrageous and sent a message that those who compromise national security won't be held accountable for their crimes. one of president obama's final acts in office will please as much as it will anger. a baby has been born to a previously infertile couple in ukraine using a new type of "three—person ivf". doctors in kiev are reported to have used a method called pro—nuclear transfer in what is a world first. it is not the first baby born with dna from three parents, however. another child was created using a slightly different method in mexico last year.
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leaders of the train drivers union, aslef, are meeting southern rail bosses this morning in a new attempt to resolve their long running dispute. next week's three—day strike by drivers on southern rail has been suspended ahead of the talks. the union is in dispute with southern‘s parent company gtr over the role of conductors on driver—only operated trains, amounting to britain's worst rail strikes in 20 years. thomas cook is preparing to bring thousands of british holiday—makers home from gambia because of a worsening political crisis there. the foreign office is advising people to avoid all but essential travel to the country, after its president refused to step down and declared a state of emergency. thomas cook said it was implementing contingency plans to bring home all its uk customers on additional flights over the next 48 hours. the supreme court is ruling today on whether disabled travellers are legally entitled to priority use of wheelchair spaces on buses even when there are babies
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in buggies on board. the case was triggered when wheelchair user doug paulley attempted to board a bus but was unable to when a woman refused to move her buggy. first group says its current policy of "requesting, not requiring" other passengers to move is the most feasible solution, but mr paulley insists it's discriminatory. harry got this touch. he says i have the privilege of knowing mr paulley. if the bus company had put 10% of doug's effort into disability awareness training then we wouldn't be where we are today. we are expecting the courtjudgement be where we are today. we are expecting the court judgement from the supreme court, the highest court in the land, any time around tennish. angela says, "i have seen pa rents tennish. angela says, "i have seen parents abuse bus drivers if they can't get their buggy on the bus which is out of order. disabled
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people should get priority in the same way older/disabled people get priority to use the front seats of the bus. i hope the gentleman wins his case and disabled people get priority over parents." your views are welcome. particularly if you use are welcome. particularly if you use a wheelchair, what is the access like if you're using a bus? do get in touch with us throughout the morning. use the hashtag #victorialive, and if you text, you'll be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport. jessica. dan da n eva ns dan evans is on court. he is facing marin cilic. he was the us open champion in 2014. evans wasn't really enjoying himself in the first set at all. he was broken in his very first service game. always going to be an uphill struggle. we saw him throw his racket and shake his head. the first set, he lost that 3-6 his head. the first set, he lost that 3—6 in over half an hour. we're
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into the second set now and evans is making a much biggerfight of this match. it is always going to be an uphill struggle when you lose the first set, but in the second set we have just seen evans go 6—5 up. he has got set—point i'm being told. so the second set could go that way. if that's 1—1, the second set could go that way. if that's1—1, evans could make a match of this and make his way to the third round. just to tell you as well, there has been some other big hitters on court and overnight. roger federer, he is safely through to the next round as is stan wawrinka. for british tennis fans, andy murray, sorry, andy murray will be on court later this morning. that will be live on five live sports extra. dan evans hasjust won will be live on five live sports extra. dan evans has just won that second set. so it is now 1—1. he won
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that 7-5. second set. so it is now 1—1. he won that 7—5. so got a match on our hands here, i think, victoria. some shocks last night in the fa cup. what would you pluck out? lincoln city. we talk every year about the magic of the cup. there was some real wizardry served upment lincoln 59 places below ipswich and they came through in injury time to win that 1-0. came through in injury time to win that1—0. on the came through in injury time to win that 1—0. on the whole i thought lincoln deserving. look how composed nathan arnold was to grab the goal in injury time around the goalkeeper and the fans and the team were just in complete pandemonium. look how much it meant to the players and all the staff. this is the first time lincoln city reached the fourth round of the fa cup in 41 years. the last person to take them there was graham taylor who passed away
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recently. it now sets up a brilliant tie for them at home to brighton. but not to be outdone, victoria sutton united, another non—league side, they are through. they beat afa wimbledon. afc wimbledon two leagues above them. to give you a sense of the gulf in quality, well apparent quality between the two sides, sutton are a team that rely on volunteers to stay afloat and they have got a tie against leeds, championship side, at home and such was the manager's delight at his tea m was the manager's delight at his team winning, he opened up the bar at home and invited all the fans back for a celebratory drink. as you do! we have the latest on the police
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chiefs council talking about the number of victims of abuse in football. 526 victims have come forward , football. 526 victims have come forward, 124 potential suspects have been identified. 248 football clubs have been impacted. this does not equate to 248 clubs under investigation, they want to make clear, but instead refers to the number of clubs referenced. so, operation hydrant, the investigation into historical child sexual abuse in football, the number of victims potentially at the moment stands at 526, 184 suspects identified, 248 clu bs 526, 184 suspects identified, 248 clubs referenced. rough seas, winter storms and long,
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dark nights make this time of year the most dangerous for migrants attempting to reach europe from north africa. but many people are still attempting the journey — often in small dinghies — with more than 1000 arriving in europe in the first two weeks of 2017. many of those were rescued on theirjourneys, but last week 100 people drowned after their boat sank off the coast of libya. despite fewer people crossing last year compared to the year before, it was the deadliest so far, with 5000 perishing at sea. alva white, who worked as a producer at the bbc before going on a secondment to msf, filmed her experience for us and this is her story of the crisis. this is my cabin. this is where i have lived for the last four months on aquarius. and i wanted to show you what is outside my porthole window. this is the night sea
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and the night sky. that is what it must look like for the people getting into these unseaworthy, dangerous boats, crammed full of way too many people. it's notjust them getting into them, but they take their children, their babies, their families. women in the last stages of pregnancy, injured people, sick people. no one makes this decision easily, no one would put themselves through that and they must be extremely terrified and extremely desperate. it's now about eight o'clock in the evening. 36 hours ago we set off from sicily, and we are now about between 30 and 35 nautical miles from the libyan coast. we position ourselves either to the east or the west of tripoli in international waters, and we patrol the area ready
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to respond to a boat in distress that need rescuing. my name is alexander, i am from belarus. i work as a captain on board aquarius. let's call aquarius is a small floating hotel and i will be the manager of this hotel. maybe it is not a 5—star, but we will try to keep as a 5—star hotel. we are on high alert for a rescue and that means we always sleep with our radios and food volume right by our head. i'm going to bed now. good night. stay where you are, we're
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going to come to you. we are going to come to you. stay where you are. we are going to come to you. i think you can see just behind me, this is the second boat who just arrived. we are trying to give them a message is, keep everyone can. we can hear them from deck, we can hear people shouting and crying. when they pull up close to the deck you can see inside the boat,
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you see all these little faces and eyes looking up at you. i need to go now and help in the shelter. today we saved two rubber boats with more or less a total of 250 people, among them 40 women, children and even some babies. when you see them and you tell yourself they are taking this journey, it is already super dangerous and you know they are also pregnant, all he can say to yourself is that they had no choice, otherwise they would not be here. of course i feel emotional, but when i'm on the boat i try not to get emotional,
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because i am here to make them trust me, i am here to make them feel safe. there is one young boy i have spoken to, he is 14 years old and he is from the ivory coast and his father died when he was ten and his mother disappeared. he was living with his grandma, and his father had a business associate from libya the kidnapped him from ivory coast and took to live with them in libya and essentially forced him to work in his house, abused him physically, he beat him, he burned him, he has got signs of physical abuse. he managed to escape, he ran down to the beach, he said it took four or five hours to make it down to the beach, he found a group of people waiting to get onto a rubber boat and he begged them if he could come with them and they said yes,
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come with us and he got onto the rubber boat and we rescued him 25 miles from the coast. i said, it's not your fault, all this stuff that happened, it's not your fault. his eyes were tearing, he couldn't look me in the face, he was shaking. i don't know what will happen to him next. he can't read or write, he hasn't been to school for the last five years, he's 14, he speaks a bit of french, he doesn't speak italian, he doesn't speak english. i'm worried for him. i don't know what will happen to him and he is one of many young, unaccompanied minors that we meet. it's about half 11 at night, everyone is asleep apart
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from a few children in the shelter that are wide awake and full of energy, their mums are exhausted. all the men are out on the deck. i hate seeing them on the metal floor of the deck with blankets. it's not the most comfortable, but at least they're safe and they're dry, though it is pretty windy and pretty rocky out there tonight, but they are really conked out. it is probably the first good night's sleep they've had in a long time. a number of them have told us about terrible times in libya, beatings, being kept in a pit before they got in the boat, extortion, people being trafficked. i'm going to go to bed now. we do a night watch schedule, i'm not on until the early morning,
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so i'm going to take advantage and get a full night's sleep. at seven o'clock this morning we had a baby boy born to a lovely lady called faith. it was a very quick labour. i was wokenjust before half past six. i saw her first at 6.30 and the baby was born at seven o'clock. everything was very normal and everyone is very happy about that. who is this? this is newman. my new baby. and why did you call him newman? i called him newman because he is a new man to me, he is a new man to god and he is a very lucky boy. for me, when i look at the sea now, i don't look at it in the same way. for me, when i look at it now, i think about all those that we didn't rescue, all those that didn't survive.
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when you rescue people and you bring people on and you meet them and you get to know them and you help them, to think of those who didn't get rescued... i want to say to the small newman, welcome. i'm not really a crier, but for some reason, whenever they leave i always had to run into my cabin and take a few minutes to myself. one guy is pretty streetwise, he has obviously been on his own for a while, he is ten. but you could see in his eyes,
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he was looking at us for some kind of reassurance. it is sad. but they are ok. if you want share that film, you can head to our programme page: bbc.co.uk/victoria still to come: nearly 5,000 calls about organised dog fighting in england and wales have been made to the rspca in the past ten years. campaigners are now calling for longer punishments to be used across the uk. we'll speak to the owner of a dog who was rescued from a dog—fight trainer.
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we'll introduce you to ruby, too, the dog who was rescued, as well as an undercover investigator. british tour operator thomas cook has started to evacuate about 1,000 tourists out of the gambia, where president yahya jammeh is refusing to step down and has declared a state of emergency. we'll find out more. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. figures relating to allegations of historical child sexual abuse in football have been released. the indicative number of victims now stands at 526. jim reed will have more later this hour. unemployment fell by 52,000 to 1.6
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million in the three months to november. the foreign secretary has said countries are "queuing up" to sign free trade deals with britain when it leaves the european union borisjohnson also suggests that agreements could be achieved quickly after the article 50 negotiations are concluded. mrjohnson is currently on a visit to india and praised theresa may's brexit speech. i think that the prime minister set out a very powerful, a very positive vision yesterday for how we can do a deal, that will notjust benefit our friends in the rest of the eu, but also drive growth in the rest of the world and one of the points i will be making here in india is that we think we can do free trade deals which will be for the benefit of both our countries, both britain and india as well. mobile operator ee has been fined £2.7 million for overcharging tens of thousands of customers. the penalty, imposed by telecoms regulator ofcom, after an investigation found that the uk's biggest mobile network broke a billing rule on two occasions,
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overcharging customers using the 150 customer services number within the eu and billing them even when the number became free to use. ee has apologised and says it has put measures in place to prevent this happening again. thomas cook is preparing to bring thousands of british holiday—akers home from gambia because of a worsening political crisis there. the foreign office is advising people to avoid all but essential travel to the country, after its president refused to step down and declared a state of emergency. thomas cook said it was implementing contingency plans to bring home all its uk customers on additional flights over the next 48 hours. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10am. here's some sport now withjessica. dan evans is up against seventh seed marin cilic in the 2nd round of the australian open. evans lost the first set 3—6, but managed to fightback in the second taking it 7—5. he's going with serve in the third
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set. non—league lincoln city beat championship side ipswich town 1—0 last night in their third round fa cup replay. it's the first time they've got this far since the late graham taylor managed them in 1976. another non—league side, sutton united, also made it through. they beat league one afc wimbledon 3—1 in their replay. they're now at home to leeds in the fourth round. manchester city midfielder yaya toure has turned down £430,000 a week to play for a chinese club. it's the second time a club in the chinese super league has tried to tempt him away from the premier league. england women head coach simon middleton has included four new faces in his 33—player squad for the six nations. england host defending champions france in their opener on 3rd february. that's all the sport for now. i will have more just after 10am.
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a wheelchair user who has taken a disability discrimination case to the supreme court is about to find out if he has won. it's the first case of its kind to be taken to such a high level. doug paulley wasn't able to get on a firstgroup bus in wetherby because a mum refused to move her child's buggy out of the wheelchair space. clive coleman is outside the supreme court. fill us in on the detail. this is a story basically about a man who tried to get on a bus in a wheelchair, the one dedicated wheelchair, the one dedicated wheelchair space was occupied by a woman with a buggy and she refused to move and it has come to this the supreme courtment the reason it has, is that it is effectively testing the policy that was operated by the bus operator first group whereby its drivers were told that they had to request, but not require someone, a non—wheelchair user to move from the wheelchair space. initially doug paulley sued and he won a ruling
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that that policy, amounted to unlawful disability discrimination. the case went to the court of appeal. they reversed that decision and now it has come to the highest court in the land and the reason it is so significant victoria is the implications for service providers whether it is train companies, supermarkets, who have disabled spacesin supermarkets, who have disabled spaces in their car parks, or disabled toilets on trabs, that kind of thing, will be watching very carefully to see just how far they have to go to ensure that wheelchair users get to use those separately dedicated spaces. so it is a really significant case as far as service providers are concerned and a significant case for doug paulley who has been fighting this battle since 2012. he'll financed out today if he has won. in the next hour, do you reckon? what are the timings, or don't we know? 9.45am for the judgement. so within the next ten minutes. we will be back with clive
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live outside the supreme court as soon as thejudgement live outside the supreme court as soon as the judgement is delivered. there have been almost 5,000 calls to the rspca reporting dog fighting between 2006 and 2015. but figures released to bbc south east show over the same period of time only 137 people were prosecuted by the charity for offences relating to dog fighting. we're about to show you two short clips given to us by the rspca. you might find them distressing so i wanted to let you know in advance. they will last less than 30 seconds. we have an acting chief inspector right here. what breeds of dogs are they? those dogs on there, are pit bull, terrier cross type dogs. 0k. jane is here. we're going to talk to steve duncan with his dog ruby who was rescued from a dogfight trainer.
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and david as well, who is an undercover investigator with the league against cruel sports and because of his work, we aren't identifying him. tell us about the state ruby was in when she was rescued. she was in a dreadful state. most of these bait dogs don't make it through, 99 out of 100 die from their injuries, but she was in a terrible, terrible state. most of her fur was she was in a terrible, terrible state. most of herfur was missing. her back tendon was bitten through. half her tail was chewed through. just dreadful, dreadful. fortunately the uk german shepherd rescue managed to rescue her and it has been a long haul, but we've got her back to the sort of condition she is in today. yes, what about, i mean, physical injuries, she has recovered
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thank goodness, do you see any other impact though? well, psychologically, she is very sort of, well you wouldn't know it at the moment, but she is very sort of low— key moment, but she is very sort of low—key and there is a way to go yet, with you she is getting there, it has been a few years, but we're going in the right direction. she is stunning. jane, going in the right direction. she is stunning.jane, can going in the right direction. she is stunning. jane, can you describe what happens in a dogfight? stunning. jane, can you describe what happens in a dogfight7m stunning. jane, can you describe what happens in a dogfight? it is one of the most barbaric forms of animal cruelty to be honest. it generally involves an organisation behind it. it's a meeting where two dogs are brought together for the purpose of fighting. are they trained to fight? how do the organisers get them to fight? unfortunately the animals are, you know, trained to fight. they are put
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through quite an intensive training regime that involves running on treadmills, sometimes steroids are given and these animals are in the peak of physical fitness when they are put into the ring to fight. and the purpose is for people to bet on which dog will win? in some instances, yes, a lot of money can change hands in these fights. instances, yes, a lot of money can change hands in these fightsm instances, yes, a lot of money can change hands in these fights. is it true that domestic dogs are stolen to act as bait sometimes? tell he what goes on there? there is a belief that this is taking place. belief? we don't know for sure. belief that this is taking place. belief? we don't know for surem is difficult to prove 100%, but certainly there have been instances and with kittens also that animals have been found with marks on them, dye, some indication that they may have been used as bait animals in fights, but it is very difficult to... what do you mean? there is two dogs, they chuck a kitten or a
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smaller dog and the two fight over that creature? when they're preparing an animal for fight, to fight, and it is during that training process, in orderto fight, and it is during that training process, in order to prove the instinct that animal is game and is willing to fight, they start to practise on various things as they go through the training process. 0h goodness me. david, tell our audience a little bit about the work that you're involved with. well, the league against cruel sports aims to try and prevent dogfighting. i think once we get to any dogfighting prosecutions we've failed anyway. we need to try and prevent it and to be able to prevent it, we need to understand how it operates and then we need to work with partners and we need to engage with others to try and find ways to educate those that wa nt and find ways to educate those that want to be involved in dogfighting, but also finding ways to be able to work as partners together to be able to prevent it and stop it happening
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in the first place. but your work undercover then, what does that involve ? undercover then, what does that involve? well, traditionally undercover work was in the field, but as we move into 215t century it has changed a lot more to being online undercover work. so dogfighters have to communicate with each other. so a lot of the undercover work is assessing the language that they're communicating with online and being able to understand what they're talking about and predicting when things are going to happen and understanding how they're going to operate. what do you with that information, if you knew they were arranging a dogfight, what do you do with the info? the information would go to the police who would go to the rspca if we knew a dogfight was about to happen. the rspca tends to take the lead. we would be pushing for the police to ta ke would be pushing for the police to take more of a lead. we realise it is to the one of their responsibilities at the moment, but we would push for the police to take a lead to deal with an impending
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dogfight, but more importantly, we would understand more of how it operates and it is only when you pool all that information together can you start making strategic decisions on how to tackle dogfighting. 0k, jane, the maximum prison sentence for being involved 01’ prison sentence for being involved or organising or attending a dogfight like the ones we've shown to our audience, five months in northern ireland and six months in england and wales. that was the maximum sentence imposed under that piece of legislation. so unfortunately, whilst, you know, we sympathize with member of the public's opinion when they hear the maximum sentence is six months, that is the maximum that can be imposed by magistrates. is it deterring anybody? is it useless in england and wales? to be honest with you, if you're operating at the lel that some of these organised gangs are, it is an occupational hazard that they will take a six month prison sentence on the chin. and clearly, that's the maximum and sentences are
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reduced anyway once they enter the prison system. we would certainly like to see things brought in line with northern ireland. is that likely to happen?” with northern ireland. is that likely to happen? i think we need do do a lot more lobbying on that fact. 0k, we appreciate your time. david, thaup for your that fact. 0k, we appreciate your time. david, thaupforyourtime, undercover investigator with the league against cruel sports. steve, the future for you and ruby? the future looks fantastic. as i say, she is fantastic with other dogs, with people, she goes to rescue events where she is basically a bit ofa events where she is basically a bit of a star. it's good, but u nfortu nately, of a star. it's good, but unfortunately, for of a star. it's good, but u nfortu nately, for every of a star. it's good, but unfortunately, for every ruby, there is hundreds of other dogs that are not so lucky. and i think really what i would like to say is when people need to re—home their dogs for whatever reason, avoid the free toa for whatever reason, avoid the free to a good home route. or that sort of thing. go to a rescue. speak to
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them. they'll point you in the right direction even if they can't take your dog, they will point you in the right direction. they are good people and i think if the public are educated to what's going on, they're going to be a lot wiser to this terrible, terrible, terrible, so—called sport. terrible, terrible, terrible, so-called sport. thank you very much. thank you, steve. and ruby. i really appreciate your time. thank you. the department for environment, food and rural affairs told us: "anyone who is cruel to an animal or does not provide for its welfare needs may be banned from owning animals, given an unlimited fine or sent to prison." coming up: we'll be finding out how thousands of grandparents could be missing out on a special government scheme designed to reimburse to reimburse them for looking after their grandchildren. thomas cook chartered planes are heading to the gambia to bring home nearly 1,000 british holiday—makers.
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it's because of the worsening political crisis. the foreign office is now advising against all but essential travel to the west african country — where president yahya jammeh is refusing to accept defeat in last month's election. our correspondent, thomas fessy, has been monitoring the situation from dakar in neighbouring senegal. there is a risk of unrest, hence foreigners brought home? yes, exactly. there is a risk of an intervention as west african states have warned mrjammeh that if he refused to step down by tomorrow, today being the end of his term, they would intervene militarily and confront his army if it was to back him by tomorrow. tomorrow is the day when his opponent and president—elect is supposed to be sworn in, but in a spectacular u—turn after he admitted defeat
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after last month's election, mr jammeh suddenly said that he rejected the result of the election, and that the vote should be rerun, and that the vote should be rerun, and so now we are into this political deadlock that risks spiralling into potential violence in the gambia, so tour operators are 110w in the gambia, so tour operators are now saying they will evacuate all the tourists and bring them back home. and after the state of emergency, then what? so, president jammeh is saying that the election challenge that he lodged with the supreme court should be heard. the problem is there is a lack ofjudges at the supreme court, and they have hired foreignjudges at the supreme court, and they have hired foreign judges to help them. thesejudges are not hired foreign judges to help them. these judges are not available before me, so the supreme court cannot hear the case before the
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month of may, so presidentjammeh is saying, i should stay in power until the court is able to hear the case and we can understand what is going on with the election results. but obviously foreign powers, the international community and president—elect adama barrow are saying that there is no way president jammeh should stay saying that there is no way presidentjammeh should stay in power until then, he should step down and adama barrow should be sworn into office, and the court case may be heard later on. thank you very much. let's bring you more now on those new figures relating to allegations of non—recent child sexual abuse in football. the number of suspects in the uk—wide scandal has reached 184, according to the national police chiefs' council. jim reed is here. the latest update, the numbers are
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over 1000. yes, the latest update, the numbers are over1000. yes, the numbers are going up and up. this refers to operation hydrant, the investigation into historical abuse in football. the number of potential victims identified is up by 100, more people still coming forward. it also looks like there has been a sharp rise in the number of clubs involved, going up the number of clubs involved, going up from 148 in december to 248 in just a month, and you imagine that thatis just a month, and you imagine that that is because some of these cases tend to involve multiple clubs, so it might be one accusation of abuse, but further investigation reveals more clubs involved. and in terms of what the police are doing to try to get the bottom of so many allegations, how are they doing this? it is interesting when you look at the statistics. most men,
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9796 look at the statistics. most men, 97% of men, from four to 20—year—old, across all tiers of sport, so this is grassroots right up sport, so this is grassroots right up to some premier league clubs involved. the vast majority do involved. the vast majority do involve football, but there have been 22 referrals involving other sports, rugby, gymnastics, martial arts, swimming, even golf, so this is across the board. the police say they are seen a decrease in the number of people coming forward to the dedicated nspcc fa helpline, but instead people seem to be contacting their local police force to recollect and coming forward that way, so the general message is, whatever way you want to come forward , whatever way you want to come forward, you either dial 101, your local police force, or this dedicated helpline, which is on the screen. thank you very much. we are waiting for a judgment from
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the supreme court brought by a man called doug paulley who couldn't get onto a bus he wanted to get onto, so decided to take it through the legal process to argue that it was discriminatory. a mum wouldn't move her pushchair. one comment says, the trouble with modern pushchairs as they are not designed to fold flat. bryo ny they are not designed to fold flat. bryony says, wheelchair users should get priority. any parent can colla pse get priority. any parent can collapse a pushchair and put it in the luggage hold. if more people realised they could be disabled tomorrow, there would be more facilities. not all parents should be tarred with the same brush. daisy says, people should move the pram for someone any wheelchair, a baby could go on your lap, you can't get of wheelchair. rebecca says london buses are a nightmare for access for
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either wheelchairs or pushchairs. michaels is the overwhelming majority of people are respectful, civil and helpful, but there are those who are obstructive, and even abusive, towards those who wish to use accessible, disabled or blue badge parking facilities. as i said, as soon as we get the ruling, we will bring it to you straightaway. thank you for your own experiences, they are really helpful in terms of informing... i'mjust they are really helpful in terms of informing... i'm just hearing that doug paulley has won a partial victory, that is all we know the moment. we will talk to our legal eagle clive coleman, who will explain exactly what that means, as soon as we get him outside the supreme court. in the meantime, we are going to talk about the latest jobless figures. we've just had the first figures of the new year on the jobless total — unemployment is down by 52,000 people, to 1.6 million. it is the lowest unemployment total for more than a decade, but the number of people in work has also
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fallen. let's talk now to the employment minister, damian hinds who is in newcastle. can you explain that our audience? this is a good start would important year. the number of unemployed people is down somewhat, and the rate is still at its 11 year low, the claimant rate is still at its record high, so this is a good start to the year. unemployment has fallen, but the number of people in work has also fallen? the number of people in work has fallen by a very, very small amount, we are talking about fractions of 1%. overall, the rate of employment has stayed at the same level as in the previous period, so it stays at the record high level, and i think it is encouraging that the unemployment level has stayed at an 11 year low, and we are seeing good progress
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particularly on youth unemployment and a new varying courage in figure on the proportion of young people who are unemployed, down to 5.3%. and what you read into these figures more broadly, considering it is the three months to november, so several months after the vote to leave the european union, when there was a period of uncertainty, let's be honest. i think these figures illustrate the underlying strength, the resilience, of the uk economy, and as we enter 2017, it will be an important year for our country clearly. this gives us confidence. they are encouraging figures, we know in ourjob centres and what we do to support people that there is a lwa ys do to support people that there is always more to do, but we start of 2017 in a good position. always more to do, but we start of 2017 in a good positionlj always more to do, but we start of 2017 in a good position. i want to ask you about mrs may's brexit speech. she said yesterday she thinks she can get a brilliant deal with the eu without any of what she
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called the downsides. is that realistic? the prime minister set out a comprehensive and positive approach to these negotiations. issue being realistic? it covered all the important areas. the primers to has always been clear that we have to maximise our trade opportunities, growth opportunities, but also make sure that we take back control over immigration, over our laws, over taxpayers' money. we have a shared interest between us and the other members of the european union into forging a deal that works for britain and works well for the european union, so that when your trading partners do well, you do well. how would the eu benefit from giving the uk a special deal? the eu will benefit of the uk economy is doing well, just as the uk economy benefits when the eu economy is doing well or indeed the american chinese economies and so on. in the
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international economy, when your trading partners are doing well, thatis trading partners are doing well, that is good for you, it is good for your own private prospects and growth prospects. there is a really important shared interest here, a lot of goodwill on both sides to make sure the best possible deal is struck. thank you very much, damian heinz, employment minister. still to come: as one of his last a cts still to come: as one of his last acts as president, barack obama has commuted the sentence of chelsea manning. we will get some reaction to that decision. let's get the latest weather with carol, looking divine is always! back at you! we have had a real difference up and down the country, —7 two plus nine, and even now, we have quite a difference, currently —6 in kent, —3
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in reading, plus three in plymouth, move further north and we are looking at a real change, because in edinburgh it is nine, as it is in stornoway. under the clear skies, edinburgh it is nine, as it is in stornoway. underthe clearskies, it is cold. we have a lot of cloud around. this picture scented earlier by one of our weather watchers from staffordshire, and another one showing parts of wales. what we have isa showing parts of wales. what we have is a weather front straight across parts of wales, the midlands and lincolnshire producing sicker cloud and also light rain and drizzle, but we have the clearer skies, allowing temperatures to be so low in the south. this large area of low pressure in the mediterranean, very u nsu btle pressure in the mediterranean, very unsubtle is, bringing snow across parts of low levels. we have no snow in our forecast, but we are dragging in this cold air from the near continent, elsewhere we have the
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milder south—westerly is, so more cloud and also some higher temperatures as we go through the course of the day. for many of us, it will amend fairly cloudy, our weather front fizzling in situ, so weather front fizzling in situ, so we will lose a lot of the patchy rain and drizzle, it willjust remain around the windward coast, and from the south west all the way up and from the south west all the way up to east anglia, we hang onto that sunshine. into the afternoon, he is the sunshine, maximum temperature in barnstaple, eight celsius, five in southampton, only four in london. so it will still feel cold. more cloud building across norfolk and the midlands through the afternoon, but you can see a lot of cloud as we move north across the rest of england. more persistent rain across shetland. north—east scotland will see some breaks, but the northern ireland, you will remain fairly cloudy through the day, any bright
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spells will be at a premium. in wales, a lot of cloud in the wake of that weather front, the odd spot of rain possible particularly around the coast. through this evening and overnight, it would be quite as cold as the nightjust gone, but it still is going to be cold enough for some frost, again some mist and fog patches likely. still damp along the coast, so milder as we travel further north, still cold in the south itself, but again tomorrow morning there will be some bright skies, sunshine coming through, we lose the mist and fog patches, and again tomorrow there will still be a lot of cloud, but a better chance of seeing some breaks across wales, northern ireland and parts of north—east england, in the shelter of the pennines. temperatures, we have been used ten and 11, but they are coming down a touch, norwich only looking at five, and then if we ta ke only looking at five, and then if we take a quick look at what is happening on friday, again quite a
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lot of cloud around, more in the south, but still the fasan seeing some sunshine. temperatures closer to where they should be the january. hello. i'm victoria derbyshire. coming up before 11am: a partial victory for a wheel care user who tried to get on a bus, but couldn't. we will be live outside the supreme court in a moment. the brexit secretary believes he can deliver the best deal for britain on leaving the eu. it is in everybody's interest to get a good deal. there are £290 billion of exports from europe to us every year, cars, pharmaceuticals, food, you name it. they want to keep that as much as we do. if you're helping look after your grandchildren and you're under 65 — you might be one of thousands of grandparents missing out
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on a special government scheme to reimburse you. we'll bring you the details. right, let's go live to the supreme court where clive coleman can tell us court where clive coleman can tell us what happened. well, this case that doug paulley a wheelchair user started in 2012 has reached the highest court in the land. doug paulley tried to get on a bus in wetherby in 2012. he is a wheelchair user and couldn't get into the dedicated wheelchair space because there was a mother with a buggy in that space. the driver of the bus, the bus was operated by first group, the bus was operated by first group, the bus was operated by first group, the bus driver asked the woman to move, and she declined. doug paulley had to get off the bus and he was delayed. initially doug paulley sued and gota delayed. initially doug paulley sued and got a ruling that the policy that first bus operates of requesting, but not requiring someone to move from the wheelchair
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space was unlawful disability discrimination. the court of appeal said there was no legal duty to make someone move. the court has come to the supreme court and doug paulley won a ruling that the policy of simply requesting is not sufficient to fulfil the duties of the bus company under the equality act. the reason we say it is a partial victory is that the ruling doesn't mean that the bus company must make someone move from that space. they have no real power to do that, but what thejudge who have no real power to do that, but what the judge who gave the lead judgement in the case said today is that requesting is not enough. if someone unreasonably refuses to move from that wheelchair space then the driver has to do more than simply request. he has to for instance turn his request into a requirement at least saying you must move from that space, although he can't physically
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eject someone from the space. he may also perhaps stop the bus for a number of minutes. the judge also perhaps stop the bus for a number of minutes. thejudge said to shame the person who is in the wheelchair space into moving. it is a partial victory and it will be watched very, very carefully by service providers around the country, we are talking about supermarkets with disabled space and train companies with disabled to i lets, train companies with disabled toilets, anywhere where there is a dedicated wheelchair space, service providers will have to do more than simply ask people who are able—bodied or not in a wheelchair to move and to vacate the spaces, they will have to up the ante, this judgement could cause confusion with service providers not quite sure how far they have to go to enforce what isa far they have to go to enforce what is a lawful policy of trying to move people out of dedicated wheelchair spaces. so a partial victory for doug paulley. he will be, i think, very pleased with this in so far as it goes. unfortunately, for him, the court did not award damages. he had
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won court did not award damages. he had wo n £5550 0 court did not award damages. he had won £55500 in damages. he has not been awarded damages and he will be disappointed, but pleased with the principle that simply requesting someone to move is not enough. cheers, clive. we will hear from doug paulley because's the supreme court. if you are a bus driver, how do you react to this judgement then? you have to do more than request that a mum or dad with a buggy move out of the space for wheelchairs, what does that mean, does it mean getting out of your cab and having a reasonable conversation? how would you interpret that? let me know. we'll bring you the rest of the news now. here is joanna. in the past hour, it's been revealed that there are now more than a thousand cases of allegations of historical child sexual abuse in football. the figures come from the national police chiefs' council. the estimated number of victims now stands at over 500. unemployment has plunged to its lowest total for more than a decade, but the number
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of people in work has also fallen. figures from the office for national statistics show that uk unemployment fell by 52,000 to 1.6 million in three months to november. but the numbers in work fell by 9,000 to 31.8 million, the lowest since last autumn. the employment minister said the figures were positive. the number of unemployed people is down somewhat and the rate is still at its 11—year low. the employment rate is still at its record high. so this is a good start to the year. southern says it will restore a full train service from next week now that aslef has suss spended action. the union is in dispute with southern's parent company gtr over the role of conductors on driver—only operated trains. amounting to britain's worst rail
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strikes in 20 years. the foreign secretary has said countries are "queuing up" to sign free trade deals with britain when it leaves the european union borisjohnson also suggests that agreements could be achieved quickly after the article 50 negotiations are concluded. mrjohnson is currently on a visit to india and praised theresa may's brexit speech. i think that the prime minister set out a very powerful, a very positive vision yesterday for how we can do a deal, that will notjust benefit our friends in the rest of the eu, but also drive growth in the rest of the world and one of the points i will be making here in india is that we think we can do free trade deals which will be for the benefit of both our countries, both britain and india as well. mobile operator ee has been fined £2.7 million for overcharging tens of thousands of customers. the penalty, imposed by telecoms regulator ofcom after an investigation, found that the uk's biggest mobile network broke a billing rule on two occasions, overcharging customers using the 150 customer services
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number within the eu, and billing them even when the number became free to use. ee has apologised and says it has put measures in place to prevent this happening again. president obama has cut the sentence of chelsea manning, who was jailed for 35 years for leaking intelligence secrets. manning's supporters have campaigned for years for her release, maintaining she's a whistle—blower and not a traitor. the former military analyst, who was born bradley manning but had hormone therapy in prison, will be released in may. thomas cook is preparing to bring thousands of british holiday—makers home from gambia because of a worsening political crisis there. the foreign office is advising people to avoid all but essential travel to the country after its president refused to step down and declared a state of emergency. thomas cook said it was implementing contingency plans to bring home all its uk customers on additional flights over the next 48 hours. that's a summary of
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the latest bbc news. more at 10.30am. here's some sport now withjess. where else should i start, but tennis? british number three dan evans is 2—1 up against marin cilic in the second round of the australian open. seventh seed cilic took the first set, but evans took the second 7—5 and the third set, 6—3. commentary from melbourne is on 5 live sports extra. andy murray is on court shortly against russian teenager andrey rublev. what a night for lincoln city. the non—league side beat ipswich town of the championship 1—0 in their fa cup third round replay. the first time they've got this far since graham taylor managed them in 1976. the drama was left until the 91st minute
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when nathan arnold scored a well—deserved winner for lincoln, who'll be at home to brighton in the fourth round. people talk about the finances, but for me, football is not about money, it is about the moment. it is about nights like this. it's about the smiles on people's faces. that's what football is about. so, you know, that to me has been the great pa rt know, that to me has been the great part of this journey. and another non—league side, sutton united, also made it through. they beat league one's afc wimbledon 3—1 in their replay. that earned sutton a lucrative televised tie at home to championship side, leeds. i thought our supporters were magnificent. they stuck with us. what a reward for them. and really, you know, this team, it isjust what a reward for them. and really, you know, this team, it is just a fantastic group of players. a great spirit amongst them and they deserve all the credit. manchester city midfielder
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yaya toure has turned down £430,000 a week to play for a chinese club. it's the second time a club in the chinese super league has tried to tempt him away. his contract at manchester city runs out at the end of the season but it's believed he wants to stay in the premier league. europe's captain will be able to choose four players for next year's ryder cup in france. thomas bjorn will get to pick one more player than darren clarke was allowed last year. it's part of a revamp of the qualifying system after europe lost heavily to the united states in hazeltine. england women head coach simon middleton has included four new faces in his 33—player squad for the six nations. england host defending champions france in their opener on 3rd february. it's a tournament that should see tamara taylor win her 100th cap — and one that she thinks is ideal preparation for the world cup later this year. ourfamily is
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our family is back together as a whole. the six nations is an amaying tournament because you get to have an international nearly every week that you don't get in any other tournament for us. so that's going tournament for us. so that's going to bea tournament for us. so that's going to be a huge preparation. again, we get to play some of the top teams in the world. on update on the tennis, dan evans 2-1 on update on the tennis, dan evans 2—1 set up in his second round tie and it is going with serve in the fourth set. it is 1—1. andy murray will be on court later. that's all the sport for now. wheelchair doug paulley has partially won his court at the supreme court against a bus operator after he tried to get on a bus, but couldn't because a buggy was in the way. the court decided that non des abled people occupying a wheelchair space can't be forced to move by law, but said bus drivers must do much more to try to sort the problem out. let's talk now to four people
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who say their disability has meant they've struggled with accessibility on public transport. will pike had an incidentjust this week on a bus where the ramp facilities weren't working. romina puma, like doug paulley, has been refused bus rides in the past because of pushchairs in the disabled space. zoe williams says one in ten trips on public transport feel like a challenge for her. samantha renke says every day feels like a tube strike for her. goodness me. ok, let's talk about what happened at the supreme court. your reaction that bus drivers they have to do a little bit more than request that someone moves the buggy from the wheelchair space by might meanfinding from the wheelchair space by might mean finding another space or shaming the person that won't move the buggy, what do you think, zoe?” think the whole point of this case was to try and get a little bit more clarity about how far bus drivers are meant to go in terms of requiring people to move out of the space. i'm not sure this ruling has actually provided that clarity.
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you're smiling. go on, will? zoe should continue. i think she hit the nail on the head. we were seeking some clarity. doug has done an incredible job in bringing this issue to light and to the mainstream media's attention and at the end of it, there is no news. it is back to square one. people are going to be searching for some grey air offia truth this this. can you envisage being on a bus, we have got this, whatever this is, thisjudgement, this ruling, and there is a buggy there. what happens?” this ruling, and there is a buggy there. what happens? i mean, i normally ask the buggy to move, that's always a bit awkward. i never once had a bus driver come to the area and ask for that to be moved. it is normally myself or somebody who i'm with. that canjust be a bit awkward. particularly when it is a full bus. it has been raining
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outside, but i need to get on that bus because like everyone else i have got a job and i have got to go places. i can't just have got a job and i have got to go places. i can'tjust wait outside for three or four buses and that has actually happened. i have been waiting for several buses. clive coleman was suggesting that, you know, the bus driver will sort of call out the parent who has got the buggy in the wheelchair space and try and shame them in some way. is that going to work? no, it is not going to work because it happened in the past. when they asked the mums or the parents to fold up the prams they say no, i'm not going to do it and the driver looks at me and says, they don't want to do it. what can i do? well, i need to get on a bus too. he can fold up the pram. i can't. it is just a priority and also, all those signs there, priority wheelchairs, it is just like, it is like an ornament. the creation. the gesture. just get rid
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of them and put some adverts instead. it is misleading, i don't think it is fair. i was recently on a train with the same scenario, i couldn't get to a wheelchair space because people had left their baggage all over. the sign said, priority by law. but if it is by law, why isn't it being enforced? why are people putting their stuff there? i think attitudes towards disability needs to change. do think there hasn't been much progress. i think there has in some areas, but people still don't realise that we are like everyone else, we have jobs, places to be. we are not going tojust sit at home, and that is where people need to change their mentality. disabled people should be thought of as integral parts of the community, and not someone that isjust
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integral parts of the community, and not someone that is just sitting at home feeling sorry for themselves, because that is completely not the case. tell me about the ramp incident, well. it wasn't within the la st incident, well. it wasn't within the last week, but we were talking about this in the green room before. all of us have a situation where the mmp of us have a situation where the ramp has broken. i have cleared a bus load of passengers on a monday morning rush—hour, and what that taps into family is the amount of confidence and mental, emotional strength it takes just to leave the house and accomplish things that would be quite straightforward for able—bodied people. and it isjust that lack of empathy sometimes and humanity within a situation that means you are left with the khyber of——a means you are left with the khyber of —— a type of conflict that nobody wants to have in dog's case, it is an example of how far people want to ta ke an example of how far people want to take it, but he is not saying that everybody should have to go down this path, because for years is far
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too long for the process, and the outcome has undermined a lot of the work it has been doing. certain charities like scope who have been supporting his case i left going, where does this leave us? because we had a response. and bus operators will be thinking that. zoe, it seems what we are talking about here is not only a shift in the minds of able—bodied people, but also still it is clear facilities which are supposed to be there for people using wheelchairs are not, or if they are, they are not functioning properly. i think that's true. if you look at the design of most public transport, it is not designed with wheelchair users in mind. there is provision made for wheelchair users within a design primarily aimed at non—wheelchair users, so you will always be an afterthought, whereas a better design would be one that actually takes the idea that
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wheelchair users do need to use this facility, and adopt that into the central part of the design rather than putting a space in afterwards. on trains, for example, there isn't enough space for luggage and wheelchairs, so luggage tends to ta ke wheelchairs, so luggage tends to take priority, because more people have luggage, but it doesn't have to be that way. if there was more space, we wouldn't have this conflict. if some bosses had space for wheelchairs and pushchairs, there would be less of a problem. let me read you some comments from people around the country. they are not also pathetic. they are not rude, but they are not all sympathetic. iris, iam rude, but they are not all sympathetic. iris, i am a rude, but they are not all sympathetic. iris, iam a mother of three who tries to use as much public transport as possible. the question is not whether a wheelchair user should always have the right to get a space on the bus. if there is a parent with one child, of course they can collapse the bushchan hold their child, but what about a mother with a toddler and a newborn. how is she supposed to have both on her lap
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and left a heavy pram? what she has tried to do with that, comment is generate some sort of sympathy towards her plight. we get it, that particular journey towards her plight. we get it, that particularjourney might towards her plight. we get it, that particular journey might become difficult for you, and what we are saying is, there are probably countless journeys where these interactions take place, and they are ogleby handled sensibly. this type of debate, pushchairs versus wheelchairs, doesn't help, it is not about these people.” wheelchairs, doesn't help, it is not about these people. i cannot in all honesty cya adult in a wheelchair has any more right to use the space provided, this comment says. has any more right to use the space provided, this comment saysm mothers with pushchairs didn't campaign to create wheelchair spaces within public transport, people with wheelchairs did. and that is the only place where a person with a wheelchair can sit on the bus. i was ona wheelchair can sit on the bus. i was on a bus last week with a mother and two very young jordan, and other
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passengers on the bus helped her arrange the children in a way that was safe. i find arrange the children in a way that was safe. ifind it arrange the children in a way that was safe. i find it generally 95% of the time, people on the bus are helpful and will help someone in difficulty, but it is a pain to have to rely on the goodwill of others, andi to rely on the goodwill of others, and i understand that, but we have to rely on the goodwill of others 100% of the time. people need to ta ke 100% of the time. people need to take a turn. what i found really heartbreaking with the stories about the trains and now today with this, i get messages from a number of people with different impairments, and they say, this is why i don't go on public transport, i am too scared. being disabled can be isolating enough without thinking, my goodness, i don't even want to get on a bus and go to the shops. i think that is what we need to look at. to be terrified tojust get on think that is what we need to look
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at. to be terrified to just get on a bus, which body else can take for granted. this person says, and forcing disabled spaces on buses is easy. stop the bus until the selfish person complies, either out of shame, or peer pressure from other passengers. the driver turned the engine off and says, right, we are not going anywhere until you move. someone is going to do that! one of the things that happened to me was i had my scooter, and it was late at night, i was tired, it was raining and cold, i just night, i was tired, it was raining and cold, ijust wanted to go home, and cold, ijust wanted to go home, and the driver didn't let me on the bus because he said that the scooter wasn't in the specification to be allowed on a bus, it was too big. it is, i checked three times. so i was very is, i checked three times. so i was very sure is, i checked three times. so i was very sure that it could go on, so i was thinking, i should gojust in front of the bus and stop the bus.
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what stop to taking that action? there was no slope to go down! but in the end, what i did, she didn't let me on, and i managed to catch the following one which was faster than the first one, so i got to my stop and i waited for her, and i knocked, and i wanted the details to doa knocked, and i wanted the details to do a complaint, but she didn't open the door, shejust do a complaint, but she didn't open the door, she just went off. that was the worst experience i had.” can see clive coleman has hotfooted it to outside of the supreme court to fill us in about this partial judgment. we have been reacting to that in the studio here, clive. partial victory is probably a better way to describe it. this battle by doug paulley, this legal battle which started when he simply try to get on a bus in 2012 to go from wetherby to leeds, and there was a policy on the bus operator at the time which was to request but not require a non—wheelchair user to
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vacate the wheelchair space. that policy has been at the centre of this legal battle. doug paulley initially won a victory that that policy was disability discrimination, that was reversed by the court of appeal, it has come to the court of appeal, it has come to the supreme court, and the supreme court today have ruled that that policy of requested that someone move from that space doesn't go far enough. doug paulley has won a victory that means the bus companies simply will have to do more. we will talk about exactly what i have to do by way of further action in a moment, but first of all let's talk to doug. five years, you just try to get on a bus! yes, who would have thought that five years on i would still be discussing that day i tried to go to my parents' for lunch! i was an hour late, my mum and dad have been at every hearing since,
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and my mother very suddenly died la st and my mother very suddenly died last summerand didn't and my mother very suddenly died last summer and didn't get to see the end of this. she has been with me all the way. it hasjust been amazing, the amount of support but i have had off so many people, disabled people, organisations, lawyers, family, allies, and this hopefully is going to make a major difference to disabled people's travel. perhaps it didn't go quite as far as you had wanted. it seems to be reading thejudgment that as far as you had wanted. it seems to be reading the judgment that what is being said is that drivers will have to put some pressure on the person who is within the space to move, but they can't physically move them, there is no legal duty which means that operators have the right to re m ove means that operators have the right to remove somebody, to kick them out of that space, but they have to do more than they currently do? not all of the justices agreed, at least one said there was the power to do that. so there was a significant agreement
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on some details. in any case, these things are always a matter of judgment. drivers have tojudge how to react to somebody smoking or causing a disturbance or eating smelly food, the famous kebabs that has appeared in every hearing. so there always has to be some judgment, and there will always be some exceptional circumstances where somebody can't be expected to move out of the space. but what this judgment means is that the driver has to make their own decision as to whether or not the person is being unreasonable in refusing to move, and if they are, he or she has to tell them that they are required to move, and if necessary reviews to move, and if necessary reviews to move the bus until they shift. sol think that is very clear. lets talk to chris fryer, your solicitor, who has been fighting this case right the way through the entire english legal system, in just about every
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court! chris, just explain. some people will think this will cause more confusion, because drivers perhaps won't know how to put pressure or how much pressure to put on somebody to move, and you could be in on somebody to move, and you could beina on somebody to move, and you could be in a worse position than you were before. it is difficult to see how it could be worse than anybody. this isa fairly it could be worse than anybody. this is a fairly clearjudgment from the supreme court, that the policy of requested retreat, the driver asking someone to move and then washing their hands on it, is a dead policy. bus companies should now be operating to the paulley principle, which is... doug, you have a principle named after you! which is... doug, you have a principle named after you !m which is... doug, you have a principle named after you! it is quite a name. so many people have done so much, this is only that have done so much, this is only that have done it on my own. chris, explaining detail what the principle is. done it on my own. chris, explaining detail what the principle ism done it on my own. chris, explaining detailwhat the principle is. it is fairly straightforward, if you are a
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disable passenger, you have enforceable rights over that space. the supreme court agreed unanimously that that was the case whether judgment falls short, and we clearly there was a dispute between three of there was a dispute between three of the supremes in particular, is there is no writers things currently stand to force someone off a bus, so it goes as far as that, but not that far yet. yet, because we know that parliament has been looking at the outcome of the case and is looking at legislating to give clarity over those additional rights, so doug has changed everything for disabled passengers. he has changed the culture, and it looks as though the decision in the fullness of time will achieve the change reality for. and a quick word with robin allen qc. he is your barrister throughout this battle. how far do you think this battle. how far do you think this principle extends in terms of service providers, talking about
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disabled parking spaces in supermarkets, disabled toilets on trains. what are service providers going to have to do in terms of looking at their policies? they have to take on board that the equality at how is this principle of reasonable adjustment, and that means that they must try and give equal access to their services to disabled people. that is why we have disabled people. that is why we have disabled car parking spaces close to the door of a supermarket, why they are wider so that doors can be opened, and so on. and they should have a policy to prevent people blocking those spaces, and they will need to think how they will do it. they might need a parking attendant or somebody in the supermarket who was or somebody in the supermarket who was willing to go out and say, not in that space, move over. and to put some serious moral pressure on to the ordinary walking public, to ensure that the disabled public have equal access to goods and services.
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doug, a final thought from you. you said your mother had followed this process right the way through, and she wasn't here to see it, but she will know now wherever she is that the paulley has been well and truly a stab wished! she was a wonderful lady, i have been incredibly lucky to have that support, so god bless you, mum. so the principle has been established, it is a wake—up call for service providers around the country that they will have to look at policies in relation to wheelchair users and make sure that those policies are sound and properly enforced. doug paulley was more positive than
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we we re doug paulley was more positive than we were initially were. is that fair? yes, he is quite positive. i'm still not so positive. i want to see what changes they're going to make. with muscular dystrophy uk we do a campaign and we work with tfl and we are happy to work with them even more to make them understand what we really need. thank you very much. thank you cord coming on the programme. nice to meet you. thank you. still to come, we'll be finding out how thousands of grandparents could be missing out on a special government scheme designed to reimburse them for looking after their grandchildren. and we're expecting to hear from european commission presidentjean—claude juncker at the european parliament after theresa may revealed her government's brexit plans. with the news, here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom. wheelchair user doug paulley has
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partially won his case at the supreme court against bus operator first group plc. the case was triggered when doug paulley attempted to board a bus in 2012 but was unable to when a woman refused to move her buggy. the court unanimously allowed the appeal, but to a limited extent. doug told our programme he welcomes the decision. it's just been amazing the amount of support that i've had of so many people, disabled people, organisations, lawyers, family, allies, and you know, this hopefully is going to make a major difference to disabled people's travel. it's brilliant. the foreign secretary has said countries are "queuing up" to sign free trade deals with britain when it leaves the european union borisjohnson also suggests that agreements could be achieved quickly after the article 50 negotiations are concluded. mrjohnson, who is currently in india on his first official visit, praised theresa may's brexit speech. it's been revealed that there are now more than a thousand cases
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of allegations of historical child sexual abuse in football. the figures come from the national police chiefs' council. the estimated number of victims now stands at over 500. unemployment has plunged to its lowest total for more than a decade, but the number of people in work has also fallen. figures from the office for national statistics show that unemployment fell by 52,000 to 1.6 million in three months to november. however, the numbers in work fell. southern has said it will restore a full train service from next tuesday, now that the train driver's union aslef has suspended its industrial action. the announcement comes after talks this morning between the two sides. the union is in dispute with southern's parent company gtr over the role of conductors on driver—only operated trains, amounting to britain's worst rail strikes in 20 years. thomas cook is bringing thousands of british holiday—makers home from the gambia
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because of a worsening political crisis there. the foreign office is advising people to avoid all but essential travel to the country, after its president refused to step down and declared a state of emergency. a team from thomas cook is expected to arrive in the gambia at around 1.30pm. the travel operator has five flights coming back to the uk today. that's a summary of the latest news. join me for bbc newsroom live at 11am. reaction from the family of us soldier chelsea manning, formerly known as bradley manningment you may have heard that president obama, has reduced chelsea manning's sentence in jail reduced chelsea manning's sentence injailfor leaking reduced chelsea manning's sentence in jail for leaking thousands and thousands of classified documents. the welsh family of chelsea manning say they are overjoyed that chelsea will soon be free adding, "we hope that chelsea will be able to get on with the rest of her life and that she finds happiness and fulfilment
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in whatever she chooses to do. there will always be a welcome for her here in wales." more reaction to that reduction in sentence after the sport. dan evans is 2—1 up against seventh seed marin cilic in the second round of the australian open. evans lost the first set 3—6, but fought back to take the second 7—5, and third, 6—3. it's currently 4—3 with evans a break up non—league lincoln city beat championship side ipswich town 1—0 last night in their third round fa cup replay. it's the first time they've got this far since the late graham taylor managed them in 1976. another non—league side, sutton united, also made it through. they beat league one afc wimbledon 3—1 in their replay. they're at home to leeds in the fourth round. europe's captain will be able to choose four players for next year's ryder cup in france. it's part of a revamp of the qualifying system after europe lost heavily
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to the united states in hazeltine. england women head coach simon middleton has included four new faces in his 33—player squad for the six nations. england host defending champions france in their opener on 3rd february. that's all the sport for now, victoria. in one of his last acts as president, barack obama has reduced the sentence of chelsea manning for leaking thousands of documents to wikileaks. formerly known as bradley manning, was sentenced to thirty five years in prison but will be freed in may. so who is chelsea manning and what has been the reaction to this decision? let's take a look. music. clea r.
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come on. president obama's decision to cut chelsea manning's sentence has, as you might expect provoked strong views. the speaker of the house of representatives, paul ryan, condemned it saying chelsea manning's treachery put american lives at risk and exposed some of our nation's most sensitive secrets. the wikileaks founderjulian assange praised the move and thanked all those who'd campaigned for manning's release. he said, "your courage and determination made the impossible possible". but pressure is growing on mr assange who has been living in london's ecuadorian embassy for more than four years. he had said last year that he would be prepared to hand himself over to the us for extradition if chelsea
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manning was released. a short time ago i spoke to jeff patterson who is the co—founder of the chelsea manning support network and colonel ann wright, a campaigner and former us diplomat. i began by asking them for their reaction to the news of chelsea manning's release. i am thrilled that president obama has taken the advice of hundreds of thousands of americans, if not millions, to commute the sentence for chelsea manning. a sentence that was unbelievably long of 35 years, and she has already served seven years. so i, along with millions of people, am thrilled that chelsea is going to be free in may 2017. you are a former american marine, you will have heard that senatorjohn mccain, chairman of the senate armed services committee, has described what barack obama has done as a grave mistake and fears it will encourage further acts of espionage. it is a slander
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against chelsea manning. she gave classified documents that should never have been classified in the first place. but who makes that decision? why is it her decision to take it upon herself to release them? well, she took a stand of conscience, that is what people do throughout history, to make the world a better place. she paid for that dearly for seven years. we're delighted that she is not going to have to die in prison for what we believe was doing the right thing. john mccain said that what she did endangered the lives of american troops, diplomats and intelligence services. yes, seven years later, you cannot point to a single person who died because of the information she provided. we have no idea if anybody died as a result of what she released.
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that's a strange thing to say. we've had seven years to find evidence that people were harmed because of that, and yet we have overwhelming evidence that people were helped. the public's right to know what was happening with our tax dollars was served through her release of these documents. does that mean that anyone in the armed forces in the states can steal and leak classified information if they declare it to be an act of conscience? indeed, they take the consequences for it, because it is a very strong act that a person does when they release classified information. but i want to add that chelsea manning's release of that information was investigated very thoroughly by the us military as part of their court—martial. the us military said that there was no injury to any us person because of the disclosure of the information that she had put
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forward through wikilea ks. but she did apologise for "hurting the us" and said she had mistakenly thought she could change the world for the better. i think she did. she also acknowledged she hurt the us. no, i don't acknowledge that. but she did. she may have, that is part of her... each person must look at it in their own conscience. at that point, when she wrote that, she felt that in some ways she did hurt the united states, but i, as a 29—year military veteran, 16 years in the diplomatic corps, i think her act was one that helped the united states, it helped the united states face the criminal acts that its military had committed,
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and hopefully now the us military will not commit those same things that were shown by the materials that chelsea manning released. as a co—founder of the chelsea manning support network, chelsea has had a very difficult time injail, tell our british audience a bit about that. chelsea manning, formerly bradley, she has begun transitioning as a female trans person. the military has made it hell on her. that's led her to attempt suicide twice in the last three or four months. a final thought about edward snowden. he also leaked thousands of documents, former us state employee, fled to russia, arguably his leaks were more serious, more dangerous. what might what has happened to chelsea manning, what might the implications for edward snowden be? he has done a remarkable thing
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for the world in the disclosure of those types of documents. the disclosure of yet more criminal acts committed by the united states that involved the privacy of all of us, of the whole world. so i do not think he should be going to prison, i don't think he should go on trial, and i think he should stay in russia until all of this is settled, because if he would return to the united states, he would be treated in the same brutal manner that chelsea manning has been treated. let's talk to frank gardner, what are the implications of reducing this sentence? it is an incredibly polarized actment to many people this is a noble and right thing to
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do by and out going president, an act of clemency, he has been produced by michael moore and by wikileaks produced by michael moore and by wikilea ks and edward produced by michael moore and by wikileaks and edward snowden himself has praised it. a lot of people will think it is the right thing to do for somebody who is transgender and should never be as a woman in a men's prison in kansas. to others, what bradleymanning who became chelsea manning is a traitor, somebody who put people's lives in danger and somebody who leaked 700,000 classified documents and essentially powered wikilea ks 700,000 classified documents and essentially powered wikileaks to the state that it is in today. i think one of the biggest implications of this is that the us and other allied countries should never again get themselves into a position where somebody who is actually was a very junior intelligence analyst, bradley
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manning as he was then, now chelsea manning, was a private first class, that's a low rank and was given access to extraordinary amounts of diplomatic classified documents. what ambassadors were saying privately about people. really embarrassing stuff, meetings they had with heads of state. bradley manning should never have been put into that position and somebody needed, you know, to be held accountable for that. i'm not exonerating. this person has been tried and has served already seven yea rs, tried and has served already seven years, but the really catastrophic m ista kes years, but the really catastrophic mistakes were made higher up the chain of command. in terms of edward snowden, what he leaked is on a different scale? totally different. chelsea manning did what at the time she thought was
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the right thing to do, and leaked it, wikileaks the right thing to do, and leaked it, wikilea ks is the right thing to do, and leaked it, wikileaks is not a proscribed organisation, but it is perfectly legal. edward snowden fled to america's adversary, moscow, and then the whole story came out. it isn't as if he fled to a neutral country, switzerland ecuador or even cuba. he went to moscow, and there is still confusion, but pretty much every body assumes the russians are not doing thisjust every body assumes the russians are not doing this just embarrass america, they wanted access to what was inside his head or in whatever files, so that has been a propaganda victory for president putin, and what edward snowden did, again it is divisive, polarised, some people think he is a hero whistle—blower, and that he exposed appalling snooping and invasions of privacy,
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others, that he enabled criminal networks, organised crime, hackers, isis, al-qaeda and other terrorist organisations to learn how they would be intercepted and listen to, so they change their methods, moved off certain platforms and went on to more encrypted platforms where they are harder to detect, and if you talk to anybody in counter—terrorism, they will say that edward snowden has made their job far harder. frank gardner, thank you very much. the number of migrants attempting to cross the mediterranean is higher than ever. earlier on the programme we brought you a film from aboard a rescue ship. she speaks arabic and french. stay where you are, we're going to come to you. you can see the film on our facebook
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page. kate allen has been telling us about the work that msf and other charities do when it comes to rescuing. that kind of work is absolutely vital. we see people dying in the mediterranean every day. last weekend, 100 people lost their lives in the mediterranean. so msf are doing brilliant work. there are also uk and other eu ships and boats out there in the mediterranean, but the real issue is why are people getting in those boats in the first place? and it is because they are absolutely desperate. they are fleeing situations in syria, iraq, afghanistan, and they have no alternative, because all of the land routes have been blocked, so this is desperate people fleeing appalling situations and being forced into those situations, and that's the issue that we should be concentrating on. you will know that critics say the fact that boats,
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government boats, charity boats, go out and rescue people when they are in trouble in the sea is encouraging others to follow, to put their lives at risk. i find that one of the most extraordinary thing is that anybody could actually stand up and say. the people who say that have not seen what is happening in syria, they have not been on the borders of lebanon and syria and scene where refugees have spent two, three, four yea rs refugees have spent two, three, four years under refugees have spent two, three, four yea rs under canvas refugees have spent two, three, four years under canvas with their children having no education and no health care. if you or i were in that situation, we would up and move and try to get to somewhere where we could protect our children and try to get health care and support. people are getting on those boats because it is the least worst option. but when they arrive on the shores of italy, and i are not being processed and sent to a refugee camp? what happens is people risk their lives coming across the mediterranean, they are being held
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in turkey now overwhelmingly. in a refugee camp? yes, but what people are trying to do is get to europe, they are trying to get to somewhere where they can perhaps have some sort of life where they can get health care, get their children into education. you know the deal that the eu came up with was that, yes, we will take some refugees, but those who have been in the saddle camps fora those who have been in the saddle camps for a period of time, not those who suddenly arrive on a boat. it is such a forced distinction. those who suddenly arrive on a boat. it is such a forced distinctionm is trying to discourage people risking their lives in a dinghy. water deer is saying is, stay put and rot where you are, and we may come and get a few of you. that is what it is actually saying. if you step back and look at whether refugee problem is globally, there are 20 million refugees in the world. there are more refugees in south africa than there are the whole of europe. so we need to get a
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sense of proportion about this as europeans. kate allen from amnesty international uk. thousands of grandparents who haven't reached the pension age of 65, and are helping bring up their grandchildren, are missing out on a special government incentive. research by an insurance group has found only a low number of applications have been made for what's being called "grandpa rents credit". let's talk now to lucy peake, chief executive of grandparents plus. and three people who don't work and all regularly look after their grandchildren. melissa manuel, who is 49. christine guylee, who is 67. lizzie, what is the issue? 9 million grandparents in the uk are caring for grandchildren, helping working pa rents to for grandchildren, helping working parents to go to work, and the government has introduced a benefit so working parents can transfer their national insurance credit to their national insurance credit to the grandparent if they are of working age. the issue is that very few are taking this up, and they
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think this is a lack of awareness. 0k, think this is a lack of awareness. ok, so if they did transfer that national insurance credit, it would be more cash for the grandparents? it protect their state pension when they become pensioners. witching cash terms can be an extra £200 a year? it is around £230 each year, so it is worth doing. we want grandparents to find out if they are eligible for it. melissa, hello. good morning. five grandchildren, is this correct? that is correct. are you sure? you don't look old enough! i have six children of my own and five grandchildren. so how regularly are you looking after them? it's quite infrequent. both of my older children work, but i still have four young children at home, sol children work, but i still have four young children at home, so i help whenever i can, the leisure, all work purposes, maybe a couple of times a week or at weekends. so
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looking after your grandchildren is your main focus, and you would eligible for these credits. did you know about them ? eligible for these credits. did you know about them? absolutely not, the first i heard of it was yesterday when i had a contact, and direct about it last night. i wasn't aware of it at all. so you need to talk to your children about transferring their national insurance credits to you so that you don't lose out when you so that you don't lose out when you do get your pension. not too far away! it is decades away, thomas lee, melissa! let me bring in christine. thank you for coming on the programme. —— honestly, melissa. christine, you are not eligible because you are 67. what do you think of that? i don't think it should matter what age you are, but ididn't should matter what age you are, but i didn't know anything about it. it would be a good thing, it would help people. do you think you do get
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enough credit, whether acknowledgement or support, when it comes to the fact that you look after your grandchildren? to be honest, i don't actually look after them now. i'd eat two or three years ago when i lived in spain. —— idea to. —— idea to. you do spend money out, and it would have been helpful to have an extra bit of money that we knew nothing about. and melissa, what about your motivation in helping your children by looking after their kids?” worked until i had my sixth baby, i sold my business the day before, and my parents were such a key part of me being able to do that, sol my parents were such a key part of me being able to do that, so i think when you have come from a big family, and the grandparents always looked after the children years ago, whether it be for work purposes or sharing the family memories or traditions, telling stories, it is just something we did naturally, and
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my mum is a heroic part of the community where we lived and were brought up, and she did it for everybody. so i think for me, nan's harris is a safe place, there is always food on the table, the kids love coming here, and i would love my children to think of me the way i think of my mum. just to recreate that stability. we are showing our audience some fabulous pictures of your grandchildren as well. lucy, what both of them are doing and have been doing actually really helps, we don't appreciate it, do we? grandparents are making this massive contribution, within their own families, providing that richness of relationship and experience for the grandchildren, but also to society as well. if you think of all of the grandparent enabling parents to work, one in four working families
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rely on grandparents for childcare, and that rises to one in three working women, so it is a huge issue, so the thing we need to explore as we push the retirement e, explore as we push the retirement age, more and more grandparents will be working themselves, so what will that do for families? how will we work this as a society in the future? so what should people do if they are eligible? the best thing to do is to go to the grandparents last website to find information. you need to check your availability with hmrc, and get the parent to transfer the benefit to the grandparent, said the benefit to the grandparent, said the best thing is to check liberty first and then it should be simple. are you sure? because that bit about getting a parent to transfer it to the grandparent... it is about making sure that both parties want this to happen, that is what it is about. thank you very much, lucy. melissa, thank you for coming on the programme. christine, many thanks
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for coming on the programme, thank you for have a new one. thank you for your many, many comments about the partial victory that doug paulley has achieved at the supreme court when it comes to wheelchair access court when it comes to wheelchair a ccess o n court when it comes to wheelchair access on buses. a wheelchair —— boss tried will have to do much more than require summary to move. clare says, my local bus company does a fantasticjob, all of says, my local bus company does a fantastic job, all of their says, my local bus company does a fantasticjob, all of their buses have a space, and many of them have a wheelchair space and a separate rushed jess base. it is frustrating when there is a buggy there and the pa rent when there is a buggy there and the parent refuses to fold it. they even give the parent a free ticket to the next bus if they agree to get off. joe says he feels some sympathy for the buggy user, often loaded with bags, impossible to collapse with one hand whilst holding a child or
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more than one child, and what if it isa more than one child, and what if it is a double buggy? does this really mean the driver must help the user into another space, or will they have to leave the bus? we will have to see what buster ivers do. thank you very much for your company today. have a good day. good morning. there is lots of sunshine around, but that is across south—eastern parts of the uk. but the majority of the uk it will stay cloudy, and that is because the wind is coming the atlantic. we have the breeze off the near continent, keeping it dry and cold, and this pattern is not likely to change through the rest of the day and into tomorrow. further north, you can see
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double—figure temperatures. this evening, we do it all again, just like last night, cloud across most areas, a few spots of drizzle, but to the south, it will be cold, cold in plymouth, temperatures not far off freezing. then the next couple off freezing. then the next couple of days or so, not much change, sunshine coming and going, and not an awful lot of change as we head into the weekend. goodbye. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11am. countries are "queuing up" to sign free trade deals with britain after brexit,
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according to foreign secretary borisjohnson. thousands of tourists — including people from britain — are being flown out of gambia after a state of emergency is declared. unemployment has plunged to its lowest total for more than a decade, but the number of people in work has also fallen. average earnings have risen since next year —— last year. president obama has cut the sentence of chelsea manning, who was jailed for 35 years for leaking intelligence secrets. also, the new silk road... for the first time, freight has travelled from china to the uk just by train. having travelled around 7500 miles. the australian open tennis championships goes into its third day, with britain's dan evans and andy murray in action.
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